John Ashbery & Gerrit Henry

May 1998

A poetry reading by John Ashbery & Gerrit Henry with introductions by Neil Grayson.

John Ashbery’s awards include the Pulitzer Prize, National Book Award, National Book Critics Circle Award and a Fullbright fellowship. His work includes Wakefulness (1998); Can You Hear, Bird (1995); And The Stars Were Shining (1994); Hotel Lautremont (1992); Flow Chart (1991); April Galleons (1987); A Wave (1984); Self – Portrait in a Convex Mirror (1975) and Some Trees which was selected by W.H Auden for the Yale Younger Poets Series.

Gerrit Henry is an art critic as well as a poet, his work has appeared in the Paris Review, Yale Review and the New York Times.

James Gilroy, Paintings

May 2 – 31 1998

A selection of paintings and works on paper by James Gilroy.

Two works in particular, Untitled 2, 1997 (33 x 25″ oilstick on paper) and Untitled 3, 1997 (33 x 25″ oilstick on paper), represent figures that could be falling or dancing. In a body of work painted a year later, there are figures that are clearly falling, for example, Boxers, 1999 (48 x 38″ oil on linen) and V, 1998 (48 x 32″, oil on linen). Continue reading “James Gilroy, Paintings”

The Interpreters: Shaping American Art, panel discussion

April 30, 1998

Panel Discussion:“The Interpreters: Shaping American Art.” Moderated by Steven Vincent, Wall Street Journal, Art & Auction. DACTYL asked five writers: Do your essays and reviews reveal or conceal your process of interpretation? As interpreter you shape the way art is perceived: as a self-evident sign or image; as a mysterious code that requires a professional interpretation; or as an “inkblot” in which one may find any meaning one likes. In your opinion, what is the best approach for engaging or creating a serious art audience? Over forty art professionals attended the discussion. Continue reading “The Interpreters: Shaping American Art, panel discussion”

Panel Discussion:”The Interpreters: Shaping American Art.

April 30 1998

Contributors include Carter Ratcliff, Rosie Schaap, Sarah Schmerler, Grady T. Turner, Alexi Worth, moderate by Steven Vincent, Wall Street Journal, Art & Auction. DACTYL asked five writers: Do your essays and reviews reveal or conceal your process of interpretation? As interpreter you shape the way art is perceived: as a self-evident sign or image; as a mysterious code that requires a professional interpretation; or as an “inkblot” in which one may find any meaning one likes. Continue reading “Panel Discussion:”The Interpreters: Shaping American Art.”

Stephen Jay Gould, lecture

April 23, 1998

LectureStephen Jay Gould and the Antioch Review, with an introduction by Robert S. Fogarty. Gould teaches biology, geology and the history of science at Harvard University, where he has been on the faculty since1967. Well known for his popular scientific writings, in particular his monthly column in Natural History magazine, he is the author of thirteen books, including: Ever Since Darwin; Evolution & Extinction : Eassys; Full House : The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin; Human Evolution; Mismeasure of Man; Ontogeny and Phylogeny; and Why People Believe Weird Things : Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time. “The history of life is not necessarily progressive; it is certainly not predictable. History includes too much chaos, or extremely sensitive dependence on minute and unmeasurable differences in initial conditions, leading to massively divergent outcomes based on tiny and unknowable disparities in starting points.” -Stephen J. Gould.

Stephen Jay Gould

April 23 1998

Stephen Jay Gould and the Antioch Review, with an introduction by Robert S. Fogarty. Gould teaches biology, geology and the history of science at Harvard University, where he has been on the faculty since1967. Well known for his popular scientific writings, in particular his monthly column in Natural History magazine, he is the author of thirteen books, including: Ever Since Darwin; Evolution & Extinction : Eassys; Full House : The Spread of Excellence from Plato to Darwin; Human Evolution; Mismeasure of Man; Ontogeny and Phylogeny; and Why People Believe Weird Things : Pseudoscience, Superstition, and Other Confusions of Our Time. “The history of life is not necessarily progressive; it is certainly not predictable. History includes too much chaos, or extremely sensitive dependence on minute and unmeasurable differences in initial conditions, leading to massively divergent outcomes based on tiny and unknowable disparities in starting points.” -Stephen J. Gould.


Artist Neil Grayson Gets Favorable Showing at Sussman Home

Monday, March 16, 1998
Miami Herald
Article by Buddy Clarke

Insurance executive Stanley Sussman and his wife Janice are longtime admirers of the paintings of young artist Neil Grayson. The Sussmans have many of Grayson’s unusual paintings hanging in their 8,000 square-foot Boca West penthouse. Their son, David J. Sussman, of Westport, Conn., has his share as well; besides being an admirer of Grayson” art, he serves on the Board of Directors of the Dactyl Foundation, an organization that Grayson founded. Continue reading “Artist Neil Grayson Gets Favorable Showing at Sussman Home”

Ann Lauterbach & Heather Ramsdell, poetry review in Zing Magazine

9:35 A.M. My clock radio clicks into a jazz riff as it has for a week. In my haze of half-sleep I reach to it and turn the dial , winding slowly through a cross-section of morning radio. Phrases, words, half words the faster I wind. Soon it is only sounds that pulse in and out, blend, and break-up. Slowing, I allow it to become whole again, turning back into words and phrases that muster a familiarity that has no context save that to which my still dreaming mind refers. Continue reading “Ann Lauterbach & Heather Ramsdell, poetry review in Zing Magazine”

Wai Chee Dimock, 1998 essay award recipient

1998

Wai Chee Dimock’s essay, “A Theory of Resonance,” which appeared in the October 1997 issue of PMLA, offers the concept of “noise” as a provocative analogy for interpretive contexts. Unlike many other writers on the same topic, Dimock makes the claim that noise is positive, “a necessary feature of a reader’s meaning-making process. Continue reading “Wai Chee Dimock, 1998 essay award recipient”

Audrey Code, paintings

September 1997

The inaugural exhibition at the Dactyl Foundation for the Arts & Humanities featured New York artist Audrey Code. PBS Television (channel 21 in New York).

PBS Television (channel 21 in New York)
MetroGuide August 27, 1997
Interview with Audrey Code and Neil Grayson.


“I’m very much interested in classical drawing, classical painting. . . but updated. I place the canvas on the floor and do a lot of splattering and pouring of paint, not randomly. It’s controlled. I call my technique a kind of learned intuition.

“Oftentimes I see representational painting that impresses me on a technical level but doesn’t move me or get me excited. I oftentimes see abstract painting that is so detached from the form that I can’t relate to it in any real way. I can’t recognize it. What I think every great artist is always searching for is a way to express the ineffable and still hold on to something tangible that the viewer can relate to as well. Audrey manages to get these two qualities in a single image. It moves you.”

Steven Vincent, 1997 essay award recipient

1997

In his essay, “Listening to Pop.” Vincent demonstrates how the lesson of Claes Oldenburg’s work is distorted as it is reinterpreted today. According to the argument, representational art has reinforced the illusion of a knowable, static reality, while at the same time it has always explicitly deconstructed that illusion by its very nature of being artificial. Pop Art attempted to apply this lesson at large, showing how everyday objects should be seen as signs trying to establish an eternal logos. An important lesson indeed. But one that has backfired. As Vincent argues, these everyday objects have come to re-present themselves as signifiers of a signified, reversing Pop Art’s intention. They now “represent” the Mythology of the era in which they were produced. Vincent captures the eeriness involved in such a reinterpretation and reminds us how deeply invested the human race is in its will to believe. Copies of the essay can be obtained for $7 by writing to info@dactyl.org. Note: Steven Vincent was murdered in Iraq in 2006 for questioning political practices in a NYTimes Letter to the Editor.